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Glass Fusing Terms

Hey glass fusers, I have exciting news. I’m working hard on a new glass fusing eBook. There’s a lot of helpful information out there on glass fusing, and I’m thankful to the skilled artists who generously share their knowledge. But I thought, wouldn’t it be great to have updated information consolidated into one big comprehensive eBook? A single all-inclusive resource guide for glass fusers of all skill levels.

The following is an excerpt from my new eBook. The complete list is more comprehensive and considerably longer. Here I included the terms students ask about most. I hope you enjoy it.   

Anneal – Oceanside 96 – 960°F (516°C): Super heating glass, like we do in a kiln, creates stress in the glass. We alleviate the stress, anneal the glass, by holding it a specific temperature for a designated amount of time. How long is determined by the size and thickness of the project. The larger the project the longer the hold time.

Note: Each family of fusing material has its own temperature range and recommended hold time. Consult the manufactures published guides for specifics.

C.O.E. – Coefficient of Expansion: This refers to the rate at which a specific family of fusing compatible materials expands and contracts when heated and cooled. Glasses must be of the same C.O.E. to be fusing “compatible”. Oceanside 96 glass is “tested compatible,” that is, it has been formulated and tested for fusing compatibility, and is thus labeled. All products with the Oceanside 96 label are compatible with each other.

Color Shift: Some glass colors will “strike” change color, usually become darker when heated. This is especially true of reds, yellows, and oranges. It’s a good idea to test-fire small pieces so you’ll know what to expect.

Drape 1175°F – 1200°F (635°C – 649°C): In this process the glass is placed over the outside of a mold and heated until it falls loosely around the mold.

Embossing: To create an impression, pattern, or design on the backside of a fused glass project by fusing the assembled project on 1/8-inch-thick (3mm) fiber paper cutouts.

Firing Cycle: The specific set of times and temperatures a given project will experience during heating, annealing, and cooling in a kiln.

Firing Guide: This is a step-by-step schedule to fire glass of a certain size and thickness to achieve a specific result. 

Hold / Soak: At certain times during the firing process we hold, also sometimes called soak, the glass at a specific temperature for a designated amount of time to get the desired results. 

Quick Cool: To open the kiln for the purpose of cooling the hot glass to prevent it from changing further. Always occurs above 1100°F (593°C) because glass is extremely sensitive to rapid temperature change below 1000°F (538°C). Also called “flash vent” or “rapid cool.”

Segments: Firing guides are carried out in steps called segments. Larger, thicker projects usually have more conservative firing guides and therefore a greater number of segments. 

Slumping Mold: Usually made of ceramic or stainless steel. Used to give the flat fused glass a 3-dimensioal shape or sculptural form. Most be primed before first use.

Soak: To hold the kiln temperature steady for a period of time. It allows the glass to slowly react to the heat and conform to the desired shape. 

Target Temperature: This is the temperature the glass will be taken to for a specific look or effect.

Thermal Shock: Glass breakage do to rapid temperature change. Glass is sensitive to temperature change between room temperature and 1000°F (538°C) during the heating and cooling phased of the firing. To prevent thermal shock, we heat the glass slowly from room temperature to 1000°F (538°C). Once the glass and kiln are above 1000°F (538°C) the glass can be heated as fast as possible to the target temperature. When the desired result is achieved, the glass can be cooled as fast as possible down to 1000°F (538°C). At that point the glass is fragile and should be cooled slowly down to room temperature. How slowly depends on the size and thickness of the project. Larger and thicker projects are fired slower than small projects. For example, a 4-inch square tile can be fired faster than a 12-inch square bowl.  

Safety First: It’s important to note that the materials like glass and supplies like shelf paper that we put inside the kiln are special high-refractory materials designed to withstand excessive heat and are purchased at your art glass supplier specifically for kiln work.

Excerpt from the resource guide: Glass Fusing Terms by Lisa Vogt

Happy Fusing!

Lisa

Follow my blog for weekly inspiration sent to your inbox! 

Creative Slumping Webinar

June 2, 2022

Join me and see how thinking outside the box and using ready made molds in new ways offers numerous and exciting opportunities to produce unique forms.

I’ll challenge and motivate you to transform your ordinary projects into inspiring, sculptural pieces of art!

I’m back with my popular Webinar, Creative Slumping. In this detailed Webinar, I’ll reshape the way you slump and drape glass. See how thinking differently and using ready-made molds in new ways offers numerous and exciting opportunities to produce unique forms. You’ll also learn how to make your own graceful, free-form shaped molds from readily available materials with no laborious measuring or messy mixes needed.

But we aren’t finished there…

Taking you one step further, I’ll show you how to use these different approaches, in combination, to transform ordinary projects into inspiring, sculptural pieces of art!

Don’t miss this opportunity! Webinars are a great way to get together and share the craft we love with enthusiastic artists around the world. I hope you’ll join me!

Artwear T’s by Lisa Vogt

Artwear Designed for Artists by Artists Tell them how you really feel with bold T-shirts, Eco-conscience tote bags and sassy mugs.

Artwear Eco-totes by Lisa Vogt

Artwear Mugs by Lisa Vogt

Downloadable instructional videos for every skill level.

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The Incredible & Amazing Value of Test Firings

Don’t run away screaming! I hate wasting time and throwing material away on test firings just as much as you do. Or at least I used to. But the truth is, you’ll have faster artistic growth and a more expansive set of techniques to work from, if you learn to love test firing.

Make it fun.

Envy from Advanced Glass Fusing Video

When firing a planned project, I tuck a small test piece in the kiln on the corner of the shelf. This way I have the main project to look forward to, and a bonus project to learn from.

I had a sculptural piece of art in mind for years. It was a good fit for my new video, Advanced Glass Fusing, but I didn’t know if I could pull the piece off. In my minds eye, the art curved in apposing directions. It had a strong linear pattern, accented with windows on the tips of three wings. The intricate design represented a lot of time and intense attention to detail.

Before committing to cutting the glass for the design I wanted to be sure I could create the fluid shape I wanted. I made a custom mold by draping 1” thick fiber blanket over a series of ceramic bricks and kiln posts.

The artwork would be ¼” thick. I cut a piece of double thick clear fusible glass to the size and shape of the intended art and slumped it over my custom mold. The slumped shape was close to what I envisioned. But it was too shallow and lacked dramatic flair. I made the mold steeper, giving it a more severe angle.  I also increased the hold time at my conservative slumping temperature of 1220 degrees from 20 minutes to 35 minutes. The second piece of double thick slumped beautifully. The glass had a graceful curve and broad sweeping wings.

When I assembled the intricate pieces to make the artwork I did it with confidence knowing it would be slumped in a way worthy of the effort.

That feeling of artistic freedom was empowering. It also spurred new design directions that drive me to experiment further.

Test firing is valuable on every artistic level, small scale as well as large scale.

Arctic Freeze from Advanced Glass Fusing Video

The project doesn’t have to be bold or revolutionary for you to benefit from testing a new way of construction. When making a piece that would feature a decorative element cut from a combed glass slab, I wanted to include a second pattern that reinforced my color scheme. I fired a small test of the colors I selected. Later, I used that information to create a beautifully detailed pattern blank. The blank was the perfect complement to the combed component.

Fire Storm from Fun & Fanciful Fusing Video

Before making Fire Storm for my new video, Fun & Fanciful Fusing I test fired tiny bits of glass. I wanted to determine which temperature would give me the best shiny edge quality, while retaining the irregular shapes I liked. As it turned out, I preferred the look of the pieces after being fired to a slump temperature, not the fire polish temperature.

Even failed tests have value.

A student in one of my classes made a project where they stacked a transparent amber glass on a transparent purple glass. The project was UGLY! But they created a beautiful, Winnie the Pooh brown. Now as a finished project, it was awful. But as a learning tool it was priceless. We now know how to make a rich, warm brown color on demand.

The takeaway is this; test firing is not a waste of time or materials. It’s an investment in the future of your artistic growth.

Happy Fusing!

Lisa

Follow my blog for weekly inspiration sent to your inbox! 

Fire & Ice

Advanced Glass Fusing 4-Day, Hands-on Workshop May 24-27, 2022

Only 1 Seat Left

Make Fire & Ice!

Join me and take your glass fusing to the next level!

In this class, you will push the boundaries art glass imposes. Students will explore innovative approaches to design and combine multiple advanced techniques to construct original art that reflects their own personal style. You’ll enjoy: the one-on-one instruction, making multifaceted projects, the well-equipped classroom, and the intimate class size.

You’ll love the concentrated, in-depth study and creative momentum you’ll gain while actively producing, nonstop for four consecutive days. You’ll leave class with a working knowledge of kiln operation, custom project specific firing guides, and the inspiration you’ve been craving to go bigger and do more elaborate works of fused glass art!

Creative Slumping Webinar

June 2, 2022

Join me and see how thinking outside the box and using ready made molds in new ways offers numerous and exciting opportunities to produce unique forms.

I’ll challenge and motivate you to transform your ordinary projects into inspiring, sculptural pieces of art!

I’m back with my popular Webinar, Creative Slumping. In this detailed Webinar, I’ll reshape the way you slump and drape glass. See how thinking differently and using ready-made molds in new ways offers numerous and exciting opportunities to produce unique forms. You’ll also learn how to make your own graceful, free-form shaped molds from readily available materials with no laborious measuring or messy mixes needed.

But we aren’t finished there…

Taking you one step further, I’ll show you how to use these different approaches, in combination, to transform ordinary projects into inspiring, sculptural pieces of art!

Don’t miss this opportunity! Webinars are a great way to get together and share the craft we love with enthusiastic artists around the world. I hope you’ll join me!

Artwear T’s by Lisa Vogt

Artwear Designed for Artists by Artists Tell them how you really feel with bold T-shirts, Eco-conscience tote bags and sassy mugs.

Artwear Eco-totes by Lisa Vogt

Artwear Mugs by Lisa Vogt

Downloadable instructional videos for every skill level.

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3 Advanced Glass Fusing Tips – Take Your Work to the Next Level

Advanced fusing is a broad term. What does it mean to advance? 

Advancing is moving beyond your current skill level. It’s challenging your abilities and developing your talent and learning how you can make exceptional artwork that exceeds everyone’s expectations. 

If this sounds like a huge, insurmountable task or an unrealistic goal for you, you’re not alone. Compressed into one sentence, the enormity of advancing ones craft can be a daunting motivation crusher. But don’t worry. Once we break down the steps you’ll be primed, ready and truly excited about taking action. 

Here are three top tips pros use to break through and make exhibition quality art.  

Fairy Tale Forest in Painting with Frit Video

1 Be a Master of Color

Color plays an important role in the effectiveness of your art. The colors you select convey your message. You, as the artist have the power to swing the viewers mood from tranquil, bright and cheery to thought-provoking, to stirring and stormy. When planning a new project, I consider what type of impression I want to leave and then select colors that support that intention. Reds are active and emotional. Blues are soothing, they suggest tranquility. While yellows represent happiness and contentment. Choose your colors carefully and then use them with purpose to draw the viewer into your magical world.  

Arctic Freeze in Advanced Glass Fusing Video

2 Pick a Pattern

Including patterns in your art is an essential way to increase the visual intricacy and attractiveness of your artwork. The whole idea is to capture interest and hold it as long as possible. Patterns add dimension which increases interest. This entices the viewer and engages them longer. Pattern also shows an increase in artistic exploration and creative skill on your part, and that always gets noticed.

Patterns can be simple and geometric or intricate and organic. I decide how to use pattern based on the artistic style I’m going for. For traditional designs, I like to use structured, linear patterns that illustrate organization and planning, while contemporary designs are great places to use free-flowing patterns. In effect they increase the visual movement throughout the artwork. Whatever style you chose, pattern adds drama that increases the visual quality of any piece. 

Black Tie in Sculptural Fused Glass Video

3 Go Sculptural 

Shape up. The fastest and simplest way to ramp up your artwork and advance to the next level, is to create a unique shape, and go sculptural. Sculptural pieces always have higher visual impact that translates into an increased perceived value. This is the key to taking your work from a craft or a hobby to the threshold of fine art. We are so fortunate to be working with a medium that we can manipulate and shape any way we want. Take advantage of that and you can transform ordinary into the extraordinary. 

Try using slumping molds in different ways. I combine molds to build unique shapes no one else has seen. Or I fuse several small pieces and then glue them together to create a freestanding, three dimensional tower. You can do it too. Start small. Then as you gain confidence go bigger and more elaborate.   

Go With the Flow Video


The big difference between making ordinary pieces and repeatedly producing one-of-a-kind original art is planning. 

When it’s time to make something new and exciting I begin by asking myself, what style do I want to make. Then I consider what mood the art should provoke and select an appropriate color palate. Then I layout a pattern that will reinforce my selected style. My next step is to plan what form the finished artwork will take. I ask myself; how can I manipulate the shape of the glass and display it in a unique and unexpected way that will be amazing? Then I begin the process of construction. 

I don’t always have all the answers at the beginning. But I do follow my original plan to its natural end. Often, new directions present themselves during fabrication, but I stay true to my plan. I’ll take notes on the new possibilities and revisit them later with my next new undertaking. Sometimes deviations are inevitable, like when an idea or technique fails to produce the results I had hoped. Then I go back to the first three tips, regroup and forge ahead. 

If improving your glass skills and growing your artistic style are on your list, I’m here to help you achieve success. I hope this insight helps you overcome obstacles so you can make the art of your dreams.  

Wherever you are in your artistic journey, you’re doing a great job! Keep going. Never settle. You are an amazing talent. Shine on!     

Except from my upcoming Advanced Glass Fusing Workshop.

Happy Fusing!

Lisa

Follow my blog for weekly inspiration sent to your inbox! 

Fire & Ice

Advanced Glass Fusing 4-Day, Hands-on Workshop May 24-27, 2022

Only 1 Seat Left

Make Fire & Ice!

Join me and take your glass fusing to the next level!

In this class, you will push the boundaries art glass imposes. Students will explore innovative approaches to design and combine multiple advanced techniques to construct original art that reflects their own personal style. You’ll enjoy: the one-on-one instruction, making multifaceted projects, the well-equipped classroom, and the intimate class size.

You’ll love the concentrated, in-depth study and creative momentum you’ll gain while actively producing, nonstop for four consecutive days. You’ll leave class with a working knowledge of kiln operation, custom project specific firing guides, and the inspiration you’ve been craving to go bigger and do more elaborate works of fused glass art!

Creative Slumping Webinar

June 2, 2022

Join me and see how thinking outside the box and using ready made molds in new ways offers numerous and exciting opportunities to produce unique forms.

I’ll challenge and motivate you to transform your ordinary projects into inspiring, sculptural pieces of art!

I’m back with my popular Webinar, Creative Slumping. In this detailed Webinar, I’ll reshape the way you slump and drape glass. See how thinking differently and using ready-made molds in new ways offers numerous and exciting opportunities to produce unique forms. You’ll also learn how to make your own graceful, free-form shaped molds from readily available materials with no laborious measuring or messy mixes needed.

But we aren’t finished there…

Taking you one step further, I’ll show you how to use these different approaches, in combination, to transform ordinary projects into inspiring, sculptural pieces of art!

Don’t miss this opportunity! Webinars are a great way to get together and share the craft we love with enthusiastic artists around the world. I hope you’ll join me!

Artwear T’s by Lisa Vogt

Artwear Designed for Artists by Artists Tell them how you really feel with bold T-shirts, Eco-conscience tote bags and sassy mugs.

Artwear Eco-totes by Lisa Vogt

Artwear Mugs by Lisa Vogt

Downloadable instructional videos for every skill level.

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Firing Surfaces – A guide for beginner to advanced fusers.

Okay, you’re thinking I’ve run out of hot topics, if I’m writing about something as trivial as firing surfaces. But firing surfaces have a significant impact on the physical appearance and manufacturing cost of your finished fused glass artwork. In my experience, those two important factors make further study into the best practical uses of the many different options worthwhile. So, let’s get to it.

Firing on a ceramic kiln shelf.

Ceramic Kiln Shelf:

The advantages of using a ceramic kiln shelf are many. A well primed (kiln washed) ceramic self will give the backside of your fused glass a smooth, professional looking finish. Re-priming a ceramic shelf is fast and easy. Plus, doing so makes little dust or mess. (I prime my ceramic shelves with 3- 5 coats of primer before every use.) And using a primed shelf is the least expensive, most cost-effective way to fire glass.

One disadvantage to a using a ceramic shelf is the primer’s dry time. You can speed up the dry time by placing the wet shelf in the sun or by heating it in a vented kiln set to 500 degrees for 15 minutes. (Be sure to let the shelf cool completely before placing any glass on top.) Another drawback is weight. Ceramic shelves are heavy, so moving them in and out of the kiln can be awkward. Size is another thing to consider. Ceramic shelves tend to be cut considerably smaller than the kiln’s interior therefore reducing the number and size or projects you can fire at one time. By cutting a larger, tighter fitting kiln shelf from fiber board, you can increase the number and size of projects that will fit.  

Firing on a fiber board kiln shelf.

Fiber Board as a Kiln Shelf:

The fiber board we’re referring to here is a high refractory material purchased at your art glass supplier specifically to use inside a kiln. It’s available in a variety of sizes and thicknesses. The sheets I use are ½ inch thick, 24 inch wide and 36 inch long. This fiber board is primed with 3-5 coats of primer before every use. The pros: it’s lightweight and cuts easily to fit tightly inside any size kiln to maximize the firing space. It becomes smoother with every coat of primer and soon produces a finish that is close to the smoothness of ceramic.

The cons: the porous material retains moisture like a sponge, therefore its flimsy when wet with primer (so moving it when wet is not recommended) and it takes longer to dry than ceramic.

White glass, and some paint-based labels like those on the backside of Grey Goose bottles, will stick to the board even if it’s well primed. Removing white based projects will pull a chunk out of the board. I fire these projects on fiber paper or primed ceramic to avoid damaging my fiber board shelves. 

Fiber board is soft. Dropping glass or another hard object on the shelf will put a hole in the smooth surface. The upside is damaged shelves can be cut down and used for shelves in smaller kilns. Or they can be cut into strips and used to dam cast glass projects. Nothing goes to waste.

Fusing on Fiber Paper:

This is special paper purchased at your art glass supplier for kiln use. It’s a convenient material designed to act as a release between fused glass and the kiln shelf. Fiber paper comes in a variety of thicknesses.

Firing on fiber paper.

Thin Fire looks, feels and cuts like regular paper. It’s identifiable by the name printed on the backside. This is a convenience product that delivers a nice smooth finish. It’s ideal when you want to quickly swap projects in and out of your kiln without having to prime shelves. The disadvantage is cost and clean up. Thin fire costs several dollars a sheet. It’s a onetime use product that turns to dust after fusing. Clean up involves vacuuming the left-over material out of your kiln.

Thin fiber paper is slightly thicker than thin fire. It has a smooth side and a textured side. Even the smooth side leaves a slight pattern behind on the backside of projects. If handled carefully, you can get more than one use out of the paper. I like to use it to emboss patterns in the bottom of my artwork. I cut shapes out of the paper with scrapbooking punches. The project it assembled in the kiln on top of the cut outs and fired. It’s a fun, easy way to add detail to your work. The disadvantage to using this material to cover a kiln shelf is the texture it leaves behind and the cost it adds to the fabrication. Clean up involves vacuuming the spent material out of your kiln.  

Firing on 1/8 inch fiber paper.

1/8 inch Thick Fiber Paper is stiff enough and durable enough to contain thick glass during the fusing process. I cut it into strips and use it to hold cast glass projects in place. The nice thing is that you can design your own custom shapes and sizes without being limited to ready made casting molds. It can also be used to make deep, ornate embossing patterns, in the backside of your artwork. If handled carefully, it’s possible to get more than one use out of this paper. Due to the added cost of this thicker material, it would be used to cover a shelf only for specialized purposes. Another drawback to this paper is the visible texture on both sides. Like it or not, this paper leaves a noticeable impression in finished fused glass projects.     

Firing on fiber blanket.

Fiber Blanket: This material is very versatile. It comes in several thicknesses that have multiple uses. I use it to cover the kiln shelf when I want to create a project with rustic texture and a wavy free form edge. It’s also flexible enough to drape over slumping molds to achieve organic shaped pieces of art. It can be primed to give your art a shinier finish or left raw for a frosted finish. Stored carefully, his material is very resilient and can be used in any number of ways repeatedly. Fiber blanket costs more than the other fiber materials, but it’s worth having a sheet in your studio due to its durability and for its experimental value. 

When deciding on a firing surface, I consider what I what to accomplish with a particular project and then select the best surface to achieve that outcome. I’d recommend having all these materials on hand. Then, when a unique project presents itself, you’ll have the flexibility to fire it on the surface best suited to create your desired effect.  

Happy Fusing!

Lisa

Follow my blog for weekly inspiration sent to your inbox! 

Fire & Ice

Advanced Glass Fusing 4-Day, Hands-on Workshop May 24-27, 2022

Only 1 Seat Left

Make Fire & Ice!

Join me and take your glass fusing to the next level!

In this class, you will push the boundaries art glass imposes. Students will explore innovative approaches to design and combine multiple advanced techniques to construct original art that reflects their own personal style. You’ll enjoy: the one-on-one instruction, making multifaceted projects, the well-equipped classroom, and the intimate class size.

You’ll love the concentrated, in-depth study and creative momentum you’ll gain while actively producing, nonstop for four consecutive days. You’ll leave class with a working knowledge of kiln operation, custom project specific firing guides, and the inspiration you’ve been craving to go bigger and do more elaborate works of fused glass art!

Artwear T’s by Lisa Vogt

Artwear Designed for Artists by Artists Tell them how you really feel with bold T-shirts, Eco-conscience tote bags and sassy mugs.

Artwear Eco-totes by Lisa Vogt
Artwear Mugs by Lisa Vogt
Fused Vessel Sinks with Lisa Vogt Video Download

Downloadable instructional videos for every skill level.

Fused Vessel Sinks & More by Lisa Vogt eBook

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How to Make a Glass Sink Polishing Stand

It’s amazing how much art and engineering have in common. Art concepts are born from a small spark. But it takes hot, burning desire, coupled with ingenuity, to actually transform such obscure ideas into physical reality. 

There’s got to be an easier way.

I’ve been making fused glass sinks for years. In the beginning, I constructed them using the layered method. This type of construction has a beautiful, round finished edge when the fused glass comes out of the slumping mold.  

It wasn’t long before I expanded my techniques and started building sinks using the cast method. This sink style is much thicker. The glass comes out of the mold with a slightly texture edge. This type of sink construction requires grinding and polishing to make the edge smooth and shiny.  

Sinks are advanced projects that involve a considerable amount of time to construct, a sizable amount of material and a skilled craftsman to complete successfully. When it comes time to cold-work your masterpiece, you want to feel confident that the job will go smoothly. And so it was our intention, to build consistency into this otherwise unstable task. That’s why we modified a readily available carpenter’s roller stand, into a customized sink support/guide that would provide us with reliable results time after time.   

If it worked for me, it’ll work for you.

This new, re-purposed tool significantly streamlined my workflow and improved my success rate. Here’s how you can make your own sink stand/guide.  

Start with your standard, home improvement store variety roller stand. Remove the metal roller. It comes off easily by depressing two buttons, one on each end of the roller. The mechanism works similar to toilet paper roll holder. Cut a 2” x 2” block of wood to fit between the uprights. Secure the wood in place with wood screws, one on each end. Cover the surface of the wood with a strip of nylon, like the white cutting board used in your kitchen. The nylon holds up longer than the bare wood and it won’t scratch your glass as the edge becomes shinny. Hold the nylon strip in place with two wood crews. Be sure to countersink the screws so they don’t come in contact with or damage your glass. Pre-drill two holes for the dowels behind the nylon strip. Press two hardwood dowels into the holes in the wooden base. These dowels serve as stops that help you maintain a consistent distance from the grinding wheel throughout the grinding and polishing process. Tip: Don’t glue the dowels in place. They wear out quickly, and therefore will need to be replaced every few sinks.  

Once you have one of these stands, you’re certain to find multiple uses for it. So don’t hesitate to add this handy tool to the supply of tools in your studio.

Supplies

Roller stand

Wood screws

2” x 2” strip of wood cut to size

1”- 1 ½” wide strip of nylon cut to size

3/8” thick hardwood dowel cut to size

Happy Fusing!

Lisa

Follow my blog for weekly inspiration sent to your inbox! 

Fire & Ice

Advanced Glass Fusing 4-Day, Hands-on Workshop May 24-27, 2022

Only 1 Seat Left

Make Fire & Ice!

Join me and take your glass fusing to the next level!

In this class, you will push the boundaries art glass imposes. Students will explore innovative approaches to design and combine multiple advanced techniques to construct original art that reflects their own personal style. You’ll enjoy: the one-on-one instruction, making multifaceted projects, the well-equipped classroom, and the intimate class size.

You’ll love the concentrated, in-depth study and creative momentum you’ll gain while actively producing, nonstop for four consecutive days. You’ll leave class with a working knowledge of kiln operation, custom project specific firing guides, and the inspiration you’ve been craving to go bigger and do more elaborate works of fused glass art!

Artwear T’s by Lisa Vogt

Artwear Designed for Artists by Artists Tell them how you really feel with bold T-shirts, Eco-conscience tote bags and sassy mugs.

Artwear Eco-totes by Lisa Vogt
Artwear Mugs by Lisa Vogt
Fused Vessel Sinks with Lisa Vogt Video Download

Downloadable instructional videos for every skill level.

Fused Vessel Sinks & More by Lisa Vogt eBook